Author Archive | RuralGP.com

Next EMRS CG VC meeting on Friday

The next EMRS ScotSTAR Clinical Governance meeting is due to take place on Friday 12th May, at 1.30pm.

These meetings take place at the EMRS base next to Glasgow Aiport, and VC links are invited (via the NHS Scotland VC Network) from rural practitioners (GPs, nurses, paramedics) across Scotland.

The team values input and opinion at these meetings from rural practitioners. Combining the insight of both referring site clinicians and retrieval teams into the intricacies of missions audited creates a fantastic learning environment. Attendees come away from these meetings enthused and encouraged to provide the highest possible levels of care for our patients.

The meeting on Friday brings a few cases under the longitudinal audit microscope. The EMRS team have chosen two of the most challenging cases, one primary and one secondary retrieval and opinion will be welcomed in dissecting out the details so that we can learn from combined experience.

To join the meeting, contact Anne Cadman (details in agenda below) with your VC details.

Download the agenda for this meeting

The above text was modified from an email sent out recently by Dr Randal McRoberts, Consultant at EMRS and lead for the Clinical Governance meetings.

Continue Reading ·

Update from the Scottish Rural Medicine Collaborative

The Scottish Rural Medicine Collaborative (SRMC) is a programme funded by the Scottish Government’s GP Recruitment and Retention Fund. The programme – chaired by Ralph Roberts (Chief Executive of NHS Shetland) – is about developing ways to improve the recruitment and retention of GPs working in a rural setting across ten Health Board areas in Scotland – Grampian, Highland, Orkney, Shetland, Western Isles, Dumfries & Galloway, Ayrshire & Arran, Fife, Tayside and Borders. Also involved are NES, NHS HR Directors, RCGP Scotland and Rural GP Association. They are now looking for assistance from the rural health community in Scotland……

The SRMC Programme Board have agreed that the programme will work in the six project areas outlined above and are looking for the following people to support this work:

  • A Programme Clinical Lead which will be funded 2 PAs (0.2 WTE) per week towards backfill for the post holder and will work across the whole Programme.
  • Project Leads for Project 2* (Rural GP Recruitment Yearly Wheel), Project 3* (Rural GP Marketing Resources) and Project 6* (Rural GP Recruitment Support). More details about these individual projects are available in Appendix 1 in the linked document below. They would be particularly interested to hear from HR Managers or Practice Managers.
  • Project Team Members for all projects. They would be particularly interested to hear from HR Managers or Practice Managers.

Please note your interest by Monday 22nd May 2017.

To find out more about these opportunities please contact either:

Download more information here (PDF)
Continue Reading ·

RRH Guide to Getting your work Published

One of the sessions at #ruralwonca was delivered by some of the team at the Journal for Remote & Rural Health.  I was really sorry to miss it, due to presenting in another session, but my tweeted request to make the advice available online was answered quickly and the presentation is now available – see below.

The journal team are keen to encourage and motivate rural healthcare professionals to share their research, and seem genuinely interested in helping budding writers to put pen-to-paper or finger-to-keyboard.

There is a lot of great innovation and problem-solving going on in rural practice.  Rural healthcare professionals tend to know their communities well, are used to dealing with limited resources, and some of the best examples of teamwork are to be found in rural settings.  However ‘being academic does not come easy to everyone, and the process of writing up evaluation and research can sometimes feel tedious and time-consuming.

However, it is now easier than ever to find interested journals, and there seems to be a drive to make the steps to getting work published more accessible.

Watch the presentation below for the RRH team’s top tips on getting your research out to a wider audience.  You can find the guidelines for authors available here.

Also, on the theme of research, here’s a great project that aims to enable rural doctors to develop their research activity through pragmatic and direct support.  Delivered by the Faculty of Medicine at Memorial University in Newfoundland, it’s called the ‘6 for 6’ programme.  Click here for more details or watch the video below.

Continue Reading ·

RuralGP.com at #ruralwonca

Today marks the start of the 14th WONCA World Rural Health Conference, being held in Cairns, Australia.

The programme is set to contain a fantastically diverse range of research and workshops covering everything from improvements in patient care, to developing new and effective ways to collaborate across boundaries in rural health.  You can follow the events on twitter using the #RuralWonca hashtag, and already there has been a huge number of comment and links

View the WONCA Rural Conference programme

So far, the vibe at #RuralWonca has been great… benefitting from Cairns hospitality (boosted by a dynamic and helpful team from ACRRM) and a stimulating range of input from stalwart experts in rural medicine, to young, enthusiastic students and young doctors.

Thursday saw a full day of proceedings for the WONCA World Working Party for Rural Health – with the annual Council meeting held in spectacular surroundings of a seminar room looking directly onto rainforest.  As well as hearing about events from the last year, and sorting out logistics for yet another busy year ahead, there was debate about how best to support member organisations and do everything possible to support the growing number of student and young doctor organisations.  The highlight of 2018 is set to be the 15th World Rural Health Conference.  Crumbs, we haven’t even started the 14th conference yet, but for a taster of what’s in store – in New Delhi – see the video below!

Friday brought the World Summit on Rural Generalist Medicine.  The concept and importance of rural generalism in health ecosystems is reaching high levels of resonance now within Australia (where political support for recognising this is higher than ever), and much further afield in both ‘developed’ and ‘developing’ nations.  It is clear that empowering rural generalism within healthcare systems has never been more important, with absolute needs to train future doctors in medical complexity, meet the demands of an ageing population and achieve the levels of health service efficiency that are often more easy to find in the generalist setting.

The Summit also saw the launch of the Japanese Rural Generalist Programme: a major achievement and indicative of the direction that other countries are likely to go too, not least through the inspiration that these developments bring.

You can follow tweets from the Summit meeting using the hashtag #RuralGeneralist

And now for the main event.  This looks set to be a stimulating and busy few days ahead, bringing together an enthusiastic and dedicated group of international confreres giving the opportunity to recognise and drive forward international innovation and collaboration in rural health.  We hope to feature a number of interviews and reports on RuralGP.com over the next few days, like we did with the last conference in Dubrovnik, between a very packed and interesting programme of events.

Follow the WONCA World Rural Health Conference on Twitter:

#ruralwonca

Continue Reading ·

What happens when Deep End goes Rural?!

Many readers will be familiar with the Deep End project, originating in Glasgow but which has spread far and wide in describing the work of GPs working in areas of urban deprivation.  The original project brought together 100 general practices serving the most socio-economically deprived populations in Scotland.  The project team has carried out a fantastic amount of work to highlight the impact of inequalities on prevalence of medical conditions and access to healthcare.

So what happens when a Deep End GP (or a GP and GP trainee, to be precise!) travel out for some time in a remote island practice?  Dr Maria Duffy and Dr Elizabeth Dryden did exactly that, when they travelled to Benbecula to spend a week with rural GP Dr Kate Dawson… and produced this short video of their experience…

 

You can follow the Deep End project on Twitter – see below.

We look forward to the sequel!

Continue Reading · 0

Setting the right path for Canadian rural practice

Thanks to Dr Douglas Deans for highlighting this recently-published report from a collaborative taskforce in Canada, which has been set up to identify positive actions that are likely to result in a more robust, sustainable and supported rural health service in Canada.  The collaboration comprises the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada (SRPC) and the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC).

The report is refreshingly succinct, relevant and pragmatic, and likely to be of interest to anyone who is trying to work out how to articulate the balance between effective action and strategic direction to influence national policies, in the context of conflicting and difficult policy decision-making.  Many rural GPs and educators will be familiar with the challenge of identifying realistic interventions which can translate into more sustainable recruitment and retention to rural communities, so this road map from Canada is likely to be a welcome read.

Recruiting and retaining family physicians in rural areas through financial incentives alone is not enough.  We need a coordinated and thoughtful alignment of education, practice policies, community involvement, and government support.  Family medicine residents who are educated in rural training sites, who immerse themselves in the communities and who see themselves supported by peers, specialists, health care providers, and evolving distance technologies, are more likely to choose rural and stay rural.

Dr Trina Larsen Soles – SRPC Co-Chair of Taskforce

News Release   Download the Report

Continue Reading ·

Rural GP Kate MacGregor is RCGP Scotland GP of the Year

From Argyll to Inner City Glasgow, GPs Awarded for Their Outstanding Care

The Royal College of GPs Scotland has announced the winners of the prestigious, annual GP of the Year and Practice Team of the Year awards.

Dr Kate MacGregor, RCGP Scotland GP of the Year

This year’s recipient of GP of the Year is Dr Kate MacGregor, a GP from Taynuilt Medical Practice in Argyll and Bute, a remote and rural practice. Dr MacGregor was nominated for the award by the family of a patient who suffered with Multiple System Atrophy, a rare condition. Dr MacGregor worked hard to get to grips with the disease, making sure the continuity of care offered to the patient was not broken, co-ordinating the care the patient received with specialists and a wider team, offering her personal mobile number, checking on them while she was abroad, offering care to the family and trying, as far as she could, to ensure that care could be received in the patient’s rural home, saving them difficult seven hour round trips to hospital.

It is Dr MacGregor’s compassion that led the partner of the patient to say that she should be ‘held up as an example to the public of the genuine difference that the GP can make to patients and their families at what can be the bleakest point of their lives.’ He said, ‘I cannot tell you how relieved we were to have a GP take ‘ownership’ of [his partner’s] care,’

The Practice Team of the Year is Garscadden Burn Medical Practice in Drumchapel, Glasgow. An inner city, urban practice, the team form one of the hundred Deep End practices that serve communities in the most deprived areas of Scotland, where Health Inequalities are rife. Dr Peter Cawston, Partner at the practice, and his team have worked to find new ways of working in an effort to improve the health and life chances of their local community. They have attached a Community Links Worker to their team and instigated ‘an entirely different, holistic approach to patient care rooted in the Drumchapel community.’ They offer social prescribing and networking with other local organisations has ‘become the norm’. The team practices what it preaches as a result of these changes and so yoga classes now form part of their own routine.

Speaking from his practice in Dingwall, Dr Miles Mack, Chair of RCGP Scotland, said:

“It is wonderful to see these awards go to two such diverse practices, representing the breadth of communities, and the breadth of GPs within them, who make up Scottish life and health. GPs really are at the heart of Scotland’s communities.

“Dr Kate MacGregor makes me proud to be a GP. The way she has taken on the difficulties blocking good care for her patients is a great example of the lifelong care GPs give families as a whole. Realising that her options from the wider healthcare system were going to be limited for this patient, because of their location, Dr MacGregor showed real gumption, took matters into her own hands and allowed her patient to receive continuous, trusted care beyond what seemed to be possible. That’s great general practice.

“In the case of Garscadden Burn Medical Practice, Dr Peter Cawston and his team have led the way in showing what a practice can offer to its community in times of real stress on the system. They have broadened what they can provide and worked together to build what is a truly inspiring resource for the people of Drumchapel. They are, obviously, an integral part of the community.

“At a time when GP services are under such severe stress throughout the country, these GPs and their teams exemplify just how vital the GP service is to Scottish life and communities. We see 90% of patients’ contact with the NHS in Scotland. It is a career to aspire to and a service that holds our communities together. Let us hope that decision makers’ support for general practice will grow to allow patients this sort of care as an expectation and let us hope that the doctors of tomorrow will be inspired to play such a vital role in their patients’ lives and will make general practice their professional choice.”

Continue Reading ·

Applications due by 7th April for Scottish Rural GP Fellowships 2017

Just a reminder that the closing date for applications to the Rural Fellowship for 2017 close this Thursday, 6th April. See the links below for more information.

beafellow.ruralgp.com

NES Logo 2005Applications are now being invited for the GP Rural Fellowship Scheme, overseen by NHS Education for Scotland.

The Fellowships offer a fantastic opportunity to build skills and experience in rural general practice, whilst experiencing the challenges and opportunities first-hand – during a well-supported year which includes nine weeks of study leave and a generous study budget.

The Fellowships are located across rural Scotland, from Dumfries & Galloway, to the Shetland Isles, including islands such as Islay, Arran, Skye and the Uists.

Many previous rural fellows have stayed in rural practice, and an article was recently published in the Journal of Rural & Remote Health – highlighting the strengths and successes of the programme which has been running for over ten years.

Rural Fellowship Facebook Page     Rural Fellowship – Official Information

Closing date for applications: Thursday 6th April 2017

Fellowships (one year) commence in August 2017.

Watch the latest video about the Fellowships…

Current Rural Fellow Gemma Munro explains more about her time as a Rural Fellow.

Why be a rural GP?

NHS Highland made this video of rural practice in Kintyre…

 

… and here’s a video from last year featuring some of the current Fellows and others involved with the scheme…

Interested?  We want to hear from you…

All the Rural Fellowship sites will welcome you to chat on the phone or visit and tour round what’s on offer.  We can fix up a chat with current or previous rural fellows, and you can ask questions on our Facebook page.  There is a lot of information available from the websites mentioned already, but sometimes it’s easier to arrange a chat on the phone or Skype… all descriptors of the Fellowships (on the official fellowships page) have contact details where you can find out more.

A couple of years ago we interviewed some of those involved in running the Rural Fellowships.  Hear more from them about what they think the fellowships can offer recently qualified GPs…

Gill Clarke – Fellowships Co-ordinator

gillGill has been running the fellowship scheme now for three years.  I asked her about the opportunities available, and why she thinks the fellowship scheme is a good way to enable recently-qualified GPs to experience rural practice.

Gill is very happy to be contacted about any of the fellowship options.  gillian.clarke1@nhs.net


Angus MacTaggart – Islay Rural GP

angusAngus is one of two principals of Islay Medical Services, which now delivers primary health care across the island, as well as out of hours and hospital services.  He describes the attractions and challenges that he identifies with rural practice.

You can contact Angus at: Angus.mactaggart@nhs.net


Jonathan Hanson – Skye Rural Practitioner (Mackinnon Memorial Hospital)

jonathanJonathan has trained in a multitude of specialties, and has found his ‘perfect’ job requiring constant generalism.  He represents the growing number of ‘acute rural GPs’ who provide hospital-based services as well as out-of-hours GP cover.  With additional strings to his bow such as anaesthetics, the services provided in Broadford mean that patients can frequently be treated locally, instead of facing long journeys to secondary care.

The contact for the Skye Fellowships is now Melanie Meecham: melanie.meecham@nhs.net


Fiona Duff – Primary Care Manager for Caithness & Sutherland (NHS Highland)

fionaFiona oversees GP services to the North of Scotland, which covers a wide geographical area.  Two fellowships are available in this area.  In this interview, Fiona highlights why a move to Sutherland could be a great career move to aspiring rural GPs.

Apologies for the phone interference in this interview, hopefully it is not too distracting!  You can email Fiona at: fiona.duff@nhs.net

 

 

Continue Reading · 0

New Report: Health & Wellbeing in Rural England

Thanks to David Syme for highlighting this report which was published on 11th March 2017.

It offers a comprehensive view of the challenges and positive aspects of accessing and providing rural healthcare in England.

The report mentions eight key ‘health risks’ of rural areas:

  • Changing population patterns
  • Infrastructure
  • Digital access and exclusion
  • Air quality
  • Access to health and related services
  • Community support, isolation and social exclusion
  • Housing and fuel poverty
  • Employment and under-employment

There will of course be similarities between the issues raised in this report, and communities elsewhere in the UK and beyond.

You can download the report from this link.

Continue Reading ·