Archive | Recruitment & Retention

#RuralGPframed – bringing rural healthcare into focus

Check the end of this article for tweets and images that have been posted online since the hashtag went live… and you can also now view most of the photos from the #ruralGPframed series at gallery.ruralGP.com too

Image from W Eugene Smith’s “A Country Doctor”.  LIFE Magazine, 1948.

the best camera is the one you have with you

1948 saw the beginning of the National Health Service in the UK.  Many of its principles were based on the development of the Highlands & Islands (Scotland) Medical Service which was launched in 1913 following the publication of the Dewar Report into the challenges of rural healthcare in Scotland – and many consider the Dewar Report to be the blueprint of today’s NHS.

1948 was also a key moment in photojournalism, when LIFE Magazine featured the photography of W Eugene Smith. His photoessay of the work of Colorado country doctor Ernest Ceriani became a benchmark for photojournalism, and remains an iconic reference in the power of photography to provide perspective and insight. A YouTube presentation of the article is available too.

Since then, photography and photojournalism has evolved significantly.   Nearly everyone now has a quality camera-phone in their pocket.  The development of digital photography has resulted in the limits of photography being confined only to battery power, memory card space, and creativity.

Dr Greg Hamill (Arran GP) and Dr Stephen Hearns (Consultant, Emergency Medical Retrieval Service) work together using ultrasound-guided vascular access in an acutely unwell patient. (Patient consent obtained).  iPhone; 2017.

And yet, some would argue that this has had the effect of devaluing the art of good photography.  Paradoxically, because photography is within such easy reach, we sometimes fail to document episodes of experience – either as we assume someone else will be, or the immediacy of image capture devalues the art of composition, style and creative depiction.  And because so many images are produced (Facebook estimates that over 300 million photos are uploaded to its website every day), it is likely that great images fail to get the recognition and prominence that they deserve.

In just over a month’s time, I will be running a ‘Practical Tips’ session at the Rural WONCA conference in Cairns, Australia – on The Visible Rural GP: developing an image bank for modern rural practice.  The idea for this evolved through a personal interest in photography and its journalistic role, an interest in ‘how do we represent rural practice to potential rural GPs’ and awareness of projects such as  Document Scotland – just one inspirational project that aims to “photograph the important and diverse stories within Scotland at one of the most important times in our nation’s history”.

A tick that I removed from a patient who presented to our Arran War Memorial Hospital one summer weekend oncall. (Assumed consent from tick).  Canon 60D, with reversed 50mm; August 2016.

Perhaps we should be considering the need for presenting inspiring, accurate visual representations of rural practice today.

And so today, in the run-up to Rural WONCA 2017, I am committing to share (via Twitter, using the hashtag #RuralGPframed) at least one photo per day, from my own images, that depicts an aspect of rural practice.

I would be delighted for others to join me.  The more images that we can collect and share, to represent the stimulation, challenge and professional satisfaction of rural practice, the more insight that others – including potential rural GPs – will have into the opportunities that rural practice can offer.

Dr Kate Dawson (GP, Benbecula) and Dr Charlie Siderfin (GP, Orkney) during a valuable opportunity to get together and discuss research opportunities in rural practice.  Fujifilm XT1; January 2017.

What about video?

‘A picture is worth a thousand words’ but video often allows a narrative and mood to be more easily captured.  Video is important, and submissions of video are welcomed to this project.

Please remember, explicit consent is required for any footage featuring patients or anything related to them. Creativity  is welcomed!

#RuralGPframed

(search Twitter)

4/4/17 Update

Within 24 hours of this post going live, we’ve had an amazing amount of coverage across the world, particularly our Australian confreres.  Keep them coming!  Here’s just a few of the tweets that we’ve picked up on the hashtag…

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Report from Islay: GURRMS Medical Student Conference

Student led conference in Islay provides novel long-term solution to rural GP recruitment

By Keenan Smith, Gregor Stark and Alistair Carr

Six months ago, we were sitting in the Glasgow University Union listening to Alistair explain his plan. He’d just returned from a five week GP placement on Islay where his eyes had been opened to the challenges and excitement that lay in rural general practice.  Despite the recruitment crisis facing general practice everywhere, and rural general practice in particular, he was convinced that if other students could experience what he had, it would inspire them too.

That evening, the five of us formed the Glasgow University Remote and Rural Medicine Society (GURRMS).  Our founding goal was to host a conference with a real and lasting impact.  With a message that no delegate could ignore: rural GP provides an exciting and dynamic career that should not be written off as a sleepy backwater of a career.

We wanted to create something that would change not just how 60 medical students thought, but that would become a staple of the undergraduate social and educational calendar – changing perceptions for years to come.

If we were going to make that much of a difference, we were going to have to think big.  We knew this had to show off everything that rural practice had to offer and that this meant going to Islay.

The Gaelic College in Bowmore was the conference venue

To say we didn’t have doubts would be a lie, we had thousands, but the largest was the central premise of the entire project: if we offered this to students, would they even want to come? A close second to this was: how would we find the funding for a conference involving the immense logistical challenges of providing transport, accommodation, and catering in an island with a permanent population of 3,500.

Despite our reservations our 60 delegate tickets sold out within four and a half hours – clearly demonstrating the demand among medical students for more exposure to rural practice. Following this, we were successful in securing sponsorship from organisations that were able to appreciate the vision and scope of what we were trying to achieve.

Dr Angus MacTaggart explaining the joys of being a rural GP

When Friday 10th of March came around, every seat in the Gaelic College was filled with eager students. Most were from Scotland but some had come from as far away as Plymouth, Oxford and Hull.

A spectacular view across Loch Indaal was the backdrop to the inaugural National Undergraduate Remote and Rural Medicine Conference. The morning session started with a talk by Dr Angus McTaggart defining what rural medicine is and the rewards it can offer. This was followed by the EMRS team talking about their role and how they interact with rural GPs.

EMRS doctors Michael Carachi and Kevin Thomson

Following a short break Dr Kate Pickering talked about the importance of medical leadership, after which a workshop took place. This gave the opportunity for two of Islay’s retired GPs, Drs Chris Abell and Sandy Taylor, to engage the students in a discussion about the benefits and challenges of working in a rural environment. Simultaneously to this another workshop took place, led by the Rural GP Fellows Drs Jess Cooper and Durga Sivasathiaseelan, leading a discussion about how to act in a rural emergency and also providing information about the Rural GP Fellowship programme.

During lunch the students chatted with patients who had volunteered to come in to speak about their experiences of rural healthcare and also to give a flavour of island life. Following lunch, Mr Stuart Fergusson kicked off with a talk about rural surgery in Scotland, after which Professor John Kinsella, Chair of SIGN Guidelines, gave a talk about the limitations of guidelines in a rural setting where he made the interesting comparison of rural medicine to the ICU environment.

Obligatory visit to sample local produce!

After another break, with more excellent catering by the Gaelic College team, the EMRS guys provided a brief overview of the realities of pre-hospital care which was then followed by five student presentations. These provided a showcase of the projects that students have undertaken whilst on rural placements or undertaken during intercalated degrees. The educational content of the day finished with a panel discussion about what Realistic Medicine is and how that applies in the rural context.

The Saturday was used to explore rural life and further experience the community we were being invited to be a part of. Some of the students explored the beautiful scenery by going for a hill walk and some participated in a joint RNLI and coastguard training exercise which involved three of the students being winched out of the sea. For the students that had caught wind of Islay’s whisky reputation, a tour of the Bruichladdich distillery was arranged where they were treated to some proper Islay hospitality.

Students participating in the Saturday hill walk

The informal feedback we have got thus far has been overwhelmingly positive: certainly more than one rural elective is being sought after last weekend. A recurring theme has been how impressed students were by the strength of the island’s community and the generosity of the locals.  Formal feedback is in the process of being collected and will be made available in due course.

The 2017-18 GURRMS committee has now been elected and have exciting plans for the future. Watch this space!

GURRMS 2017-18 committee – what does the future hold?

Cool shades featured throughout the conference!

GURRMS would like to thank all our speakers: Dr Angus MacTaggart; Dr Michael Carachi and Dr Kevin Thomson; Mr Stuart Ferguson; Dr Kate Pickering; Dr Jess Cooper and Dr Durga Sivasathiaseelan; Dr Chris Abell and Dr Sandy Taylor; Professor John Kinsella; Cameron Kay; Beth Dorrans; Josie Bellhouse; James McHugh; Eloise Miller and Hannah Greenlees.

Also our sponsors: the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow; the Rural General Practitioner Association of Scotland; the Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh; the University of Glasgow; NHS Highland and Bruichladdich distillery.  And finally a huge thanks to all of the medical team of Islay for your support and for believing in us.

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Recruiting now for Scottish Rural GP Fellowships 2017

beafellow.ruralgp.com

NES Logo 2005Applications are now being invited for the GP Rural Fellowship Scheme, overseen by NHS Education for Scotland.

The Fellowships offer a fantastic opportunity to build skills and experience in rural general practice, whilst experiencing the challenges and opportunities first-hand – during a well-supported year which includes nine weeks of study leave and a generous study budget.

The Fellowships are located across rural Scotland, from Dumfries & Galloway, to the Shetland Isles, including islands such as Islay, Arran, Skye and the Uists.

Many previous rural fellows have stayed in rural practice, and an article was recently published in the Journal of Rural & Remote Health – highlighting the strengths and successes of the programme which has been running for over ten years.

Rural Fellowship Facebook Page     Rural Fellowship – Official Information

Closing date for applications: Thursday 6th April 2017

Fellowships (one year) commence in August 2017.

Watch the latest video about the Fellowships…

Current Rural Fellow Gemma Munro explains more about her time as a Rural Fellow.

Why be a rural GP?

NHS Highland made this video of rural practice in Kintyre…

 

… and here’s a video from last year featuring some of the current Fellows and others involved with the scheme…

Interested?  We want to hear from you…

All the Rural Fellowship sites will welcome you to chat on the phone or visit and tour round what’s on offer.  We can fix up a chat with current or previous rural fellows, and you can ask questions on our Facebook page.  There is a lot of information available from the websites mentioned already, but sometimes it’s easier to arrange a chat on the phone or Skype… all descriptors of the Fellowships (on the official fellowships page) have contact details where you can find out more.

A couple of years ago we interviewed some of those involved in running the Rural Fellowships.  Hear more from them about what they think the fellowships can offer recently qualified GPs…

Gill Clarke – Fellowships Co-ordinator

gillGill has been running the fellowship scheme now for three years.  I asked her about the opportunities available, and why she thinks the fellowship scheme is a good way to enable recently-qualified GPs to experience rural practice.

Gill is very happy to be contacted about any of the fellowship options.  gillian.clarke1@nhs.net


Angus MacTaggart – Islay Rural GP

angusAngus is one of two principals of Islay Medical Services, which now delivers primary health care across the island, as well as out of hours and hospital services.  He describes the attractions and challenges that he identifies with rural practice.

You can contact Angus at: Angus.mactaggart@nhs.net


Jonathan Hanson – Skye Rural Practitioner (Mackinnon Memorial Hospital)

jonathanJonathan has trained in a multitude of specialties, and has found his ‘perfect’ job requiring constant generalism.  He represents the growing number of ‘acute rural GPs’ who provide hospital-based services as well as out-of-hours GP cover.  With additional strings to his bow such as anaesthetics, the services provided in Broadford mean that patients can frequently be treated locally, instead of facing long journeys to secondary care.

The contact for the Skye Fellowships is now Melanie Meecham: melanie.meecham@nhs.net


Fiona Duff – Primary Care Manager for Caithness & Sutherland (NHS Highland)

fionaFiona oversees GP services to the North of Scotland, which covers a wide geographical area.  Two fellowships are available in this area.  In this interview, Fiona highlights why a move to Sutherland could be a great career move to aspiring rural GPs.

Apologies for the phone interference in this interview, hopefully it is not too distracting!  You can email Fiona at: fiona.duff@nhs.net

 

 

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#RGPAS16 a major success

Last week, over eighty students, trainees, new and more experienced GPs from across Scotland and beyond, met at the annual conference of RGPAS.  An action-packed programme provided a wide variety of clinical and non-clinical topics, and there were plenty of opportunities to meet and discuss rural practice.  Rural GP-ing in Scotland is a simulating place to be!

rgpas16_-1

Scroll to the bottom of the page for more conference photos…

ruralgpscot_2016-oct-24

But we had some GPs from further afield too!

screen-shot-2016-11-03-at-00-44-28

Rural GPs from across Scotland came for the conference…

Kicking off the programme, we heard from Dr Helen Brandstorp of the National Centre for Rural Medicine in Tromso, Norway.  Helen provided a good backdrop to the fact that “we’re all in this together” – the challenges and delights of rural practice are prevalent in Norway in similar levels to Scotland.  The ground is fertile for further collaboration with international confreres and we hope to see ongoing links with our Norwegian counterparts in rural medicine.

The rest of the conference featured a rich variety of clinical and non-clinical topics of relevance to rural practice.  We were lucky to have an excellent range of engaging and entertaining speakers.  From updates in emergency medicine, to humanitarian and MSF work, to developing rural LGBT-friendly health services, to IT Reprovisioning, to research tips, to rural surgery, to featured student presentations… there was plenty going on, and the conference dinner provided plenty of opportunity to make further connections and allow the conversations to flow, along with a bit of traditional music too.

We were delighted to host a good number of students, trainees and new doctors… in particular there were nineteen heavily-subsidised student places – and they didn’t disappoint in their contributions of innovative ideas throughout the conference.

Instead of listing all the speakers here, the programme remains available – and we were delighted that over 200 #rgpas16 tweets were exchanged in the course of the conference.  We’ve collated these with Storify, and you can view the Storify timeline here.

Here’s a few of the twitter highlights:

The conference rounded off on the Saturday with a visit to the Bristow Coastguard helicopter base at Inverness Airport, where Winchman Paramedic Duncan Tripp and his colleagues treated student and experienced GPs to a tour round the facilities, including one of their £26 million Sikorsky search and rescue helicopters.

Thanks to all those who presented, and to all others who contributed to the conference planning.  The event proved to be fun, engaging and relevant to rural practice.  We hope to do the same next year – provisionally booked at the Craigmonie Hotel again on 2nd-4th November 2017.  Meantime, at RGPAS we are keen to stimulate and encourage further work in Scottish rural practice.  A new committee was formed, and I am delighted to take the helm of an able and enthusiastic team.  It’s going to be an exciting year!

Here’s some photos of the event…

 

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Rural GPs Scotland (RGPAS) Conference 2016 – registration open

newlogosquaretextTwitter hashtag: #RGPAS16

The annual RGPAS (Rural GP’s Association of Scotland) conference will be held on Thursday 3rd and Friday 4th November 2016, at the Craigmonie Hotel in Inverness.

Once again, we hope to welcome both new and experienced rural health professionals, and we have a stimulating programme lined up to cover a wide spectrum of topics which are relevant to rural general practice in Scotland.


Programme

The latest programme will be kept updated here: http://scotland.ruralgp.com/conferences/

Thursday 3rd November 2016

(Lunch can be organised with the Craigmonie Hotel by prior arrangement – please contact them directly).

1330 Registration & Tea/Coffee

1400 Introduction :: Dr David Hogg (Rural GP, Isle of Arran)

1415 Rural Medicine – a Norwegian Perspective :: Dr Helen Brandstorp (National Centre of Rural Medicine, Tromso, Norway)

1445 Transfers Workshop :: Dr Iain Cromarty (Rural GP, Isle of Hoy) 

1450 Initial response and getting people away to hospital :: Dr Iain Cromarty

1505 Stabilisation & Treatment in the Rural Hospital :: Dr Kate Dawson (Rural GP, Benbecula)

1520 Transfer & the role of ScotSTAR Retrieval Teams :: Dr Sarah Maclean (Senior Clinical Fellow in Aeromedical Retrieval, EMRS/ScotSTAR)

1535 Discussion & Comments

1600 Refreshments

1620 Legal Highs  – should we be worried? … and other A&E Hot Topics :: Dr Luke Regan (Emergency Physician, Raigmore Hospital)

1700 Rural GP & Humanitarian Work: A Journey to Congo, Pakistan and beyond :: Dr Catherine Sutherland (Rural GP Fellow, Isle of Arran & MSF Volunteer)

1930 Conference Dinner :: Venue TBC

2200 Music Session at The Craigmonie Bar :: Open to all musicians, hummers, spoon-players…


Friday 4th November

0815 Breakfast Mentoring Session 

0900 LGBT Youth in Rural Communities :: Dr Thom O’Neill (Paediatric Clinical Research Fellow, NHS Lothian)

0945 BASICS Scotland Update :: Dr Ben Price (Assistant Clinical Director, BASICS Scotland & GP, Auchterarder)

1000 Sandpiper Trust: We Want to Support You :: Aly Dickson (Founding Trustee, The Sandpiper Trust)

1015 Rural Prehospital Care: Discussion

1025 Remote Island Medicine in Tanzania :: Dr Isla Hislop (Sessional Rural GP)

1045 Refreshments

Parallel Session A:

1100 Finding your Inner Teaching Mojo (Undergraduate Teaching Workshop) :: Dr Jim Finlayson

1145 GP IT Reprovisioning for Rural Practice in Scotland :: Speaker TBC

Parallel Session B: For Students & New Doctors :: Led by Dr Gemma Munro and GP Rural Fellows 2016-17

1100 Workshop: So You Want to Be a Rural GP?  Tips & experiences on what makes it fab

1215 Lunch

1300 The Challenges of Rural Medicine: New Models of Delivery :: Dr Charlie Siderfin (Rural GP, Orkney)

1330 Getting into rural research :: Prof Phil Wilson (Centre for Rural Health, Inverness)

1400 Pecha Kucha Presentations (back by popular demand) – presentations where a maximum of 20 slides auto-advance every 20 seconds, thus being able to keep lots of presentations to time!

Consortium of Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships, Toronto :: Dr Chris Williams (University of Dundee)

Invitational Symposium on Rural Health, Tromso (Norway) :: Dr David Hogg (Rural GP, Isle of Arran)

A Medical Elective on the Isle of Arran :: James McHugh (Glasgow University)

A Medical Elective on South Uist :: Michael Durbar (FY1, Complex Care Medicine, Royal Bolton Hospital, Lancashire)

Selected Medical Student Innovations (TBC)

1445 Refreshments

1500 AGM – all welcome

Including reports and standing items

Update from the Scottish Rural Medicine Collaborative Update (Dr Chris Williams)

University GP Societies – what can we do to support them?

Hot topics & representations

1700 Conference Closing Comments


For details about our student scholarships, please see this page.  Please also note our heavily discounted fees for students and trainees.

To register, please email hello@ruralgp.scot .

Registration Form
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New research: rural recruitment & retention

rural-4In January this year, I was contacted by Pauline von Zabeltitz, a final year student at the University of Aberdeen, who was studying for an MA (Hons) in Economics and International Relations.

For her dissertation, she was keen to explore the various projects and initiatives being used to improve recruitment and retention to rural GP practice in Scotland.

Pauline has very kindly agreed to having her dissertation published on RuralGP.com in order to share the analysis that she has undertaken over the last six months.  Her report provides yet more substance behind some of the core issues that we know affects rural recruitment & retention, whilst providing another perspective and some new ideas to add to the present work on this area.

Coming from a family with a strong medical background, healthcare related issues have always been of great interest to me and throughout my degree, I got the chance to explore this topic further through a Health Economics course. Discussing Health Economic issues and policies led me eventually to my final Dissertation topic, writing about the recruitment and retention issues in rural Scotland regarding healthcare providers such as GPs.

Specific issues highlighted include rural connectivity, access to undergraduate placements and the GP Rural Fellowship scheme.  She manages to cover a wide spectrum of other considerations, and some evaluation of present approaches to this problem.

You can download her report by clicking on the button below.

An analysis of current initiatives targeting the recruitment and retention of GPs to remote and rural Scotland [1.4 MB]

.

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Second round of Scottish Rural GP Fellowships 2016 – recruiting now

NES Logo 2005Applications are now being invited for the second round of the GP Rural Fellowship Scheme, overseen by NHS Education for Scotland.

The Fellowships offer a fantastic opportunity to build skills and experience in rural general practice, whilst experiencing the challenges and opportunities first-hand – during a well-supported year which includes nine weeks of study leave and a generous study budget.

The Fellowships are located across rural Scotland, from Dumfries & Galloway, to the Shetland Isles, including islands such as Islay, Arran, Skye and the Uists.

Many previous rural fellows have stayed in rural practice, and an article was recently published in the Journal of Rural & Remote Health – highlighting the strengths and successes of the programme which has been running for over ten years.

Rural Fellowship Facebook Page     Rural Fellowship – Official Information

Closing date for applications (2nd round): Tue 24th May 2016

Interviews will be held in Inverness on Friday 3rd June.  Fellowships (one year) commence in August 2016.

Why be a rural GP?

In January last year, the BBC Countryfile team visited Arran to see for themselves…

 

… and NHS Highland recently made this video of rural practice in Kintyre…

 

… and here’s a video just released (March 2016) featuring some of the current Fellows and others involved with the scheme…

Interested?  We want to hear from you…

All the Rural Fellowship sites will welcome you to chat on the phone or visit and tour round what’s on offer.  We can fix up a chat with current or previous rural fellows, and you can ask questions on our Facebook page.  There is a lot of information available from the websites mentioned already, but sometimes it’s easier to arrange a chat on the phone or Skype… all descriptors of the Fellowships (on the official fellowships page) have contact details where you can find out more.

Last year we interviewed some of those involved in running the Rural Fellowships.  Hear more from them about what they think the fellowships can offer recently qualified GPs…

Gill Clarke – Fellowships Co-ordinator

gillGill has been running the fellowship scheme now for three years.  I asked her about the opportunities available, and why she thinks the fellowship scheme is a good way to enable recently-qualified GPs to experience rural practice.

Gill is very happy to be contacted about any of the fellowship options.  gillian.clarke1@nhs.net


Angus MacTaggart – Islay Rural GP

angusAngus is one of two principals of Islay Medical Services, which now delivers primary health care across the island, as well as out of hours and hospital services.  He describes the attractions and challenges that he identifies with rural practice.

You can contact Angus at: Angus.mactaggart@nhs.net


Jonathan Hanson – Skye Rural Practitioner (Mackinnon Memorial Hospital)

jonathanJonathan has trained in a multitude of specialties, and has found his ‘perfect’ job requiring constant generalism.  He represents the growing number of ‘acute rural GPs’ who provide hospital-based services as well as out-of-hours GP cover.  With additional strings to his bow such as anaesthetics, the services provided in Broadford mean that patients can frequently be treated locally, instead of facing long journeys to secondary care.

The contact for the Skye Fellowships is now Melanie Meecham: melanie.meecham@nhs.net


Fiona Duff – Primary Care Manager for Caithness & Sutherland (NHS Highland)

fionaFiona oversees GP services to the North of Scotland, which covers a wide geographical area.  Two fellowships are available in this area.  In this interview, Fiona highlights why a move to Sutherland could be a great career move to aspiring rural GPs.

Apologies for the phone interference in this interview, hopefully it is not too distracting!  You can email Fiona at: fiona.duff@nhs.net


David Hogg – Arran Rural GP

headshot15David oversees the Arran Rural GP Fellowships along with Dr Greg Hamill.  Over half the Arran GP team have been Fellows in the past, and the Arran GP Fellowship offers a great mix of core GP, OOH and community hospital work.  Arran is the highest rated island destination in Scotland by TripAdvisor (4th in the UK) and has a great mix of outdoor activities and culture.

You can contact David: david.hogg@nhs.net

 

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Recruiting now for Scottish Rural GP Fellowships 2016

You can find out about the 2017 Rural Fellowships here.

NES Logo 2005Applications are now being invited for the GP Rural Fellowship Scheme, overseen by NHS Education for Scotland.

The Fellowships offer a fantastic opportunity to build skills and experience in rural general practice, whilst experiencing the challenges and opportunities first-hand – during a well-supported year which includes nine weeks of study leave and a generous study budget.

The Fellowships are located across rural Scotland, from Dumfries & Galloway, to the Shetland Isles, including islands such as Islay, Arran, Skye and the Uists.

Many previous rural fellows have stayed in rural practice, and an article was recently published in the Journal of Rural & Remote Health – highlighting the strengths and successes of the programme which has been running for over ten years.

Rural Fellowship Facebook Page     Rural Fellowship – Official Information

Closing date for applications: 7th April 2016

Fellowships (one year) commence in August 2016.

Why be a rural GP?

In January last year, the BBC Countryfile team visited Arran to see for themselves…

 

… and NHS Highland recently made this video of rural practice in Kintyre…

 

… and here’s a video just released (March 2016) featuring some of the current Fellows and others involved with the scheme…

Interested?  We want to hear from you…

All the Rural Fellowship sites will welcome you to chat on the phone or visit and tour round what’s on offer.  We can fix up a chat with current or previous rural fellows, and you can ask questions on our Facebook page.  There is a lot of information available from the websites mentioned already, but sometimes it’s easier to arrange a chat on the phone or Skype… all descriptors of the Fellowships (on the official fellowships page) have contact details where you can find out more.

Last year we interviewed some of those involved in running the Rural Fellowships.  Hear more from them about what they think the fellowships can offer recently qualified GPs…

Gill Clarke – Fellowships Co-ordinator

gillGill has been running the fellowship scheme now for three years.  I asked her about the opportunities available, and why she thinks the fellowship scheme is a good way to enable recently-qualified GPs to experience rural practice.

Gill is very happy to be contacted about any of the fellowship options.  gillian.clarke1@nhs.net


Angus MacTaggart – Islay Rural GP

angusAngus is one of two principals of Islay Medical Services, which now delivers primary health care across the island, as well as out of hours and hospital services.  He describes the attractions and challenges that he identifies with rural practice.

You can contact Angus at: Angus.mactaggart@nhs.net


Jonathan Hanson – Skye Rural Practitioner (Mackinnon Memorial Hospital)

jonathanJonathan has trained in a multitude of specialties, and has found his ‘perfect’ job requiring constant generalism.  He represents the growing number of ‘acute rural GPs’ who provide hospital-based services as well as out-of-hours GP cover.  With additional strings to his bow such as anaesthetics, the services provided in Broadford mean that patients can frequently be treated locally, instead of facing long journeys to secondary care.

The contact for the Skye Fellowships is now Melanie Meecham: melanie.meecham@nhs.net


Fiona Duff – Primary Care Manager for Caithness & Sutherland (NHS Highland)

fionaFiona oversees GP services to the North of Scotland, which covers a wide geographical area.  Two fellowships are available in this area.  In this interview, Fiona highlights why a move to Sutherland could be a great career move to aspiring rural GPs.

Apologies for the phone interference in this interview, hopefully it is not too distracting!  You can email Fiona at: fiona.duff@nhs.net


David Hogg – Arran Rural GP

headshot15David oversees the Arran Rural GP Fellowships along with Dr Greg Hamill.  Over half the Arran GP team have been Fellows in the past, and the Arran GP Fellowship offers a great mix of core GP, OOH and community hospital work.  Arran is the highest rated island destination in Scotland by TripAdvisor (4th in the UK) and has a great mix of outdoor activities and culture.

You can contact David: david.hogg@nhs.net

 

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Rural Fellowships in Scotland 2016 – find out more…

NES Logo 2005R&R Fellowship Advert goes out mid March

Are you looking for a new challenge or looking for a rural job and want to have more experience or supported learning before you take the plunge? If so then the NES Remote and Rural GP Fellowship might be the answer.

The fellowships will be advertised on the NES website in mid March and offer R&R placements both in General Practice (standard fellowships) and small hospital settings (acute fellowships). The fellowship opportunities vary enormously and include island settings such as Arran and Skye and placements nearer major towns such as Aberfeldy and Cowal, Bute and Stranraer. The placements are for 1 year starting in August. There are sometimes opportunities to start them later in the year so don’t let finishing ST3 late put you off applying.

There is a generous educational allowance in terms of a budget for training and there is also a 2- 3 month leave opportunity  meaning you can get on with doing some of the more difficult and time consuming  learning you might want to do. Previous fellows have done coil training, dermatology diplomas, minor surgery training and Anaesthetic, Paediatric and Palliative care placements.

3 Fellowship courses are provided a year and we organise these in rural settings generally including an island setting and somewhere near the mountains. We cover a mixture of topics on the courses such as emergency obstetrics, ENT and Ophthalmology for remote doctors, mountain medicine and retrieval and then we also look at the humanities in medicine with a rural bias. The fellows are encouraged to take an organisational role in courses and often proffer their experience for training themselves. Last year Andrea did a wonderful session on Mindfulness and Yoga for beginners. This year Sarah is doing a session on Palliative care practical skills. The aim of the courses is to provide a fun and inclusive training experience encouraging the fellows to develop networking opportunities.

Peter and Cat try doing Paeds training in castle grounds

Peter and Cat try doing Paeds training in castle grounds

Jenny and Zoe package a child just off the beach at Onich

Jenny and Zoe package a child just off the beach at Onich

Andrea teaches Mindfulness in Islay

Andrea teaches Mindfulness in Islay

Holly teaching about the advantages of European medical exchanges at the Orkney course with newborn baby

Holly teaching about the advantages of European medical exchanges at the Orkney course with newborn baby

If you are interested in the scheme phone Gill Clarke the scheme co-ordinator on 01463 233 823 for further information. Go on take the plunge and do something different. It’s only for a year and it might change your life!

View more information about the fellowships here.

… or visit the Rural Fellowships Facebook page

Photos by Gillian Clarke
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