Archive | Video

GP Rural Fellowships in Scotland – now recruiting

10090292646_b973088caa_zFancy having a year to experience the challenges and stimulation of being a Rural GP?  Details of the 2015 round of GP Rural Fellowships is now available, and applications are invited now.

The fellowships, part of an established programme of fellowships run by NHS Education for Scotland, are aimed at qualified GPs who wish to experience a year of rural practice, as part of a supported programme of education, practical experience and peer contact.

The one-year GP Rural Fellowships represent an opportunity to work in Scotland to develop the generalist skills required to work in some of the most beautiful areas of our country. There are two types of Rural Fellowship – ‘Standard’ and ‘Acute Care’. In addition the choice of Fellowships has been increased, so a wider range of locations is now available.

  • The ‘standard’ GP Rural Fellowship option based on the curriculum for rural practice developed by the Remote and Rural Training Pathways Group (GP sub-group Final Report Sept 2007).
  • The newer GP Acute Care Rural Fellowship option based on the, GP Acute Care Competencies work following from the agreement of the Framework for the Sustainability of Services and the Medical Workforce in Remote Acute Care Community Hospitals.

These posts have been particularly attractive to newly/recently qualified GPs, but are open to all GPs who are interested in working in rural practice.

Further information about these posts is available on the NES website, and the practices/hospitals involved with the Fellowship programme are very happy to hear from anyone interested in finding out more.

Closing date is 23rd April 2015

Photo by Bernard Blanc, used under Creative Commons licence

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Medical Students – why go rural?

videoiconRural practice offers a wealth of learning opportunities for medical students.  If you’re thinking about ‘going rural’ for your GP placement, you might want to watch this video that has been produced to highlight what rural practice has to offer.

Aberdeen and Dundee Universities already have rural programmes for GP experience.  Glasgow is making these increasingly available.  If you’re interested, speak to your GP department about what rural practices you can go to as part of your GP block.

Some useful links:

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Rural Medicine in Alberta

Every so often we do a quick Google search to pick up any new videos on rural medicine.  Here’s one I found recently – a 15 minute feature on the work of Dr Mike Kolber who is a rural GP in Peace River, Alberta in Canada.

It’s a great insight into the varied work that rural practice brings, and into the spectrum of practice that Dr Kolber carries out.  From community hospital work to general clinics, he highlights the range of presentations that all rural GPs need to deal with.

He also highlights some of the personal challenges – and privileges – of rural practice, such as those occasions when you have to treat friends and colleagues.

Have a look, see what you think.  Maybe it will inspire you to create a similar video on your practice!…

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ED0YUqsB9pg]

 

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Rural Fellowship on Orkney – Video

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Dr Holly Tyson, current Orkney Rural GP Fellow, has made this video to explain what her fellowship has involved so far, and to encourage folk to apply for this year’s intake of Rural Fellows.  Today is the last day for applications!  To apply, see this page about the fellowships, and the information on the NES website.

Here’s a transcript of her video commentary:

I am currently, undertaking the Scottish remote and rural fellowship programme on Orkney.  My work is split between working in Dounby Health centre on the West Mainland and their satellite practice in Evie and working in the single-handed practices on some of the remote Orkney Islands. These single-handed practices are dispensing practices.  Whilst working in the single handed practices I am doing all my own out of hours work and managing any emergencies for potentially prolonged periods until emergency transport is available to move the patient to a secondary care facility.  The most exciting moment I had was transferring a sick patient in the middle of the night by boat from the small isle of Hoy to mainland Orkney and riding on the bridge of the boat on the way back!

During this year I have done courses in pre-hospital emergency care, paediatric emergencies, ophthalmological emergencies, obstetric emergencies, neonatal examination and resuscitation. I would recommend future fellows to take full opportunity of the study leave and budget to explore their interests and learning needs as I found this a particular benefit of the year.

I am also undertaking a research project ‘Recruitment and Retention of Female GPs in their first five years post qualifying as GPs to Remote and Rural Areas. A qualitative study.’ This will compare data collected from female GPs in their first 5 years post qualifying as GPs who underwent the rural fellowship in Scotland and a similar demographic group in Australia. The study will cover key topics in rural recruitment and retention including social factors, life work balance, advancement of career and exposure to and support for rural clinical experience. The study will use data collected during interviews over a 6-month period. The objective is to identify what factors influence the retention of this group of medical graduates in rural areas. The conclusions of this study may contribute to initiatives aiming to enhance the working and living environment for rural GPs, and thus recruitment and retention.

One of the best things about living and working on Orkney is the quality of life. Aside from working in a friendly and close community my dog enjoys long walks on the beaches and frequently accompanies me to the small isles. Our hens provide our breakfast every morning and the pigs provide endless amusement. Although the winter was, as expected, rather cold and windy, we had fantastic Northern lights displays behind our house. I am looking forward to going to the folk festival this summer and getting out on the sea in the Kayaks. I would recommend the fellowship to anyone who likes a challenge and doing something a bit different.

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GP Rural Fellowships in Scotland – now recruiting

10090292646_b973088caa_zDetails of the 2014 round of GP Rural Fellowships is now available, and applications are invited now.

The fellowships, part of an established programme of fellowships run by NHS Education for Scotland, are aimed at qualified GPs who wish to experience a year of rural practice, as part of a supported programme of education, practical experience and peer contact.

The one-year GP Rural Fellowships represent an opportunity to work in Scotland to develop the generalist skills required to work in some of the most beautiful areas of our country. There are two types of Rural Fellowship – ‘Standard’ and ‘Acute Care’. In 2014/15, there are eight Standard Fellowship Posts and four Acute care fellowship posts available:

  • The ‘standard’ GP Rural Fellowship option based on the curriculum for rural practice developed by the Remote and Rural Training Pathways Group (GP sub-group Final Report Sept 2007).
  • The newer GP Acute Care Rural Fellowship option based on the, GP Acute Care Competencies work following from the agreement of the Framework for the Sustainability of Services and the Medical Workforce in Remote Acute Care Community Hospitals.

These posts have been particularly attractive to newly/recently qualified GPs, but are open to all GPs who are interested in working in rural practice.

A wealth of information about these posts is available on the NES website, and the practices/hospitals involved with the Fellowship programme are very happy to hear from anyone interested in finding out more.

Closing date is 21st April 2014

Last year, Arran Medical Group (which is one of nine centres offering a fellowship) produced the following video.  It might help to give a taster of what you might end up doing!

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuUlKwxPtXU

 

Photo by Bernard Blanc, used under Creative Commons licence

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New Zealand: Rural connectivity is an issue there too

nzrgpn14-logoThe New Zealand Rural General Practice Network held their annual conference last weekend.

They’ve helpfully recorded a series of video interviews with their speakers and leaders, and these are available here.

Earlier this week, we published this article about the problems faced by rural communities in accessing adequate mobile phone coverage, and fast broadband internet.

This interview with Craig Young of Chorus, a telecoms company in New Zealand, explains some of the strategies that they have adopted to improve rollout of digital connectivity to rural areas of the country.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vSgIr7nj7I ]

 

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New Zealand: Community hospital GP practice

nzrgpn14-logoThe New Zealand Rural General Practice Network held their annual conference last weekend.

They’ve helpfully recorded a series of video interviews with their speakers and leaders, and these are available here.

In this video, Carol Atmore explains what has been happening in New Zealand to develop better support and recognition for GPs who provide community hospital services.

This is a big issue.  In the UK, GP work in community hospitals remains unrecognised as a specific skill, and remains under threat from ever-more specialist approaches.  Development of strict competency frameworks – which are simply impossible for generalists to adhere to – threaten to trim the edges off the spectrum of generalist investigation possible in rural community hospitals.  For example, to be deemed ‘competent’ in ultrasonography now demands time and case turnover that simply cannot be achieved by a rural GP who has multiple other generalist skills to maintain.

Rural-proofing national competency frameworks is essential to allow rural patients to access key investigations and procedures, as well as to ensure the necessary support to avoid professional isolation and maintain safe practice.  This video from Dr Atmore offers suggestions and examples of where some of these challenges have been overcome in New Zealand.

[youtube http://youtu.be/fct0QKv_8R8 ]

 

 

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Arran Resilience: supporting rural emergencies

Arran resilienceArran Resilience was set up in October 2010, as a result of a GP Rural Fellowship project.

Recently, David Hogg (GP & Arran Resilience co-ordinator) and Mark Nelson (RNLI volunteer) were invited by NHS Highland to take part in their ‘Being Here’ conference, looking at how to support rural communities and develop local resilience.

The event was recorded by HCVF Television and they’ve allowed us to reproduce the video here.  You can view all the videos from the day, at their NHS Highland TV channel.

Arran Resilience is a cost-neutral, community-led initiative which aims to bring all the emergency services together.  Meetings are held to discuss pan-island issues, multi-agency training is organised and many chocolate hobnobs are consumed in the process.

In 2013 the Emergency Planning Society named Arran Resilience the UK Resilience Team of the Year.

 

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New Zealand: medical students in rural practice brings benefits for all

nzrgpn14-logoThe New Zealand Rural General Practice Network held their annual conference last weekend.

They’ve helpfully recorded a series of video interviews with their speakers and leaders, and these are available here.

In this video, Wairoa GP Ron Janes explains why training opportunities in rural GP practices have great benefits both for student and teacher, as well as the wider healthcare team.  Involvement in teaching is extremely useful to keep a practice refreshed with energy and new clinical approaches.

 

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Latest guidance on concussion: take it seriously

EHow seriously do we take concussion?  It appears that there is a wide range of response to the sports player who has taken a knock to the head, and then suffers ongoing symptoms as a result.  These symptoms can be mild, and range from nausea and feeling a bit dazed, to convulsions and collapse – but all deserve appropriate assessment, and a low thresh-hold for time-out, at least until symptoms have fully resolved.

The following poignant video tells the story of Ben Robinson, a 14 year old school rugby player.  He received a number of impacts to his head during a Belfast rugby match in 2011, following which he collapsed and died.  His father highlights the importance of taking one impact and resulting symptoms seriously. Continue Reading →

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