Archive | Postgraduate

EZIO Skills

Intra-osseous access to the intravascular space has fast been developed for more general and adult use over the last five years.  Innovation has been sped up by the experienced gained from military settings, including Afghanistan.

Whether you’ve become a seasoned EZIO user, or haven’t seen this before, the following videos may be handy to review/refresh what can make IO access more attractive than persevering for IV access.  Having been issued with one of these myself, and had the occasion to use it on several occasions, it’s clear the the initial fear felt (including those watching who are unfamiliar with the process) is rapidly dissipated by the ease of use in severe cases, such as trauma or cardiac arrest situations.

BASICS Scotland responders are lucky to have the continuing support from the Sandpiper Trust, and if you are a regular responder for  the Scottish Ambulance Service, you can apply to add one of these to your kit.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkTCKOBiQws

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ff_vqePp_jw

 

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Conference: Retrieval 2013

The Emergency Medical Retrieval Service is once again proud to host Retrieval 2013, the UK’s leading conference covering prehospital, transfer and retrieval medicine on the 25th & 26th April 2013.

Speakers include:

  • Derek Feeley – CEO, NHS Scotland
  • Dan Ellis – Medical Director, MedSTAR Adelaide Australia
  • Martin Ruth – Clinical Lead, RAF Aeromed
  • Russell McDonald – Associate Professor, Co director EM Fellowship programme, University of Toronto
  • Claire Westrope – ECMO Transport Consultant & Paediatric Intensivist Leicester
  • David Ohlen – Medical Director, Airborne Intensive Care Sweden
  • Anni Ridsdill Smith – Director Airate Lt

This year we have dedicated sessions for nursing and paramedic staff involved in prehospital care, transfer and retrieval along with interactive case based discussions and a free paper session.  Following previous years there is also dedicated paediatric and neonatal sessions as well as prehospital care.  Further sessions will focus on Human Factors in medicine as well as Innovation and Quality Improvement.

The conference is again being held at the Beardmore Conference Centre, Scotland’s top residential conference centre.

Cost for registration remains the same as last year provided you register before the 1st January 2013.

You can download the conference registration form here and the abstract form here.

Click here to view Retrieval 2013 programme

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BASICS Scotland: Adult Tele-Education

BASICS Scotland Responder (staged)

Places are available for the BASICS Scotland Adult Immediate Medical Care course, to be delivered via videoconference from January 2013.

The course will include the following skills:

  • Scene Safety and Mechanisms of Injury
  • Spinal Management
  • Patient Assessment
  • Airway, Breathing & Circulation Management
  • Secondary Survey
  • Packaging for Transport
  • Live RTC Scenario with participant interaction

The sessions will include a mix of formally delivered education, along with interactive practical sessions.

The deadline for applications is November 30th 2012.  Further details are available from the following documents:

>> Information Sheet

>> Booking Form

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Rural Mentoring Survey: Results

Many thanks to everyone who took part in the mentoring survey, which closed tonight after 2 weeks.  This was kindly hosted by RCGP.  Over fifty rural medical practitioners responded, with some useful and insightful results.

The raw data are presented below.  If you can’t see anything, you can also download a PDF file here.  Apologies that this is slightly clunky – and please note that comments are presented at the end of the PDF.  If you have a large screen, it may be worthwhile opening up two windows so you can follow the questions and free text answers at the same time.

Further analysis will be carried out to summarise the main conclusions.  It is hoped to present this on RuralGP.com in the next few weeks.  In the meantime, I have made the following observations on what could be considered the ‘next steps’:

  • Development of a profiles page, giving details of rural GPs who are prepared to act as mentors for committed trainees. (With some time for thought about how this should be co-ordinated and supported).
  • Development of a scholarship scheme for medical student electives.
  • Play down the role of social media, and improve quality student/trainee access to good rural practice experience.

Discussion can take place via the various email groups, or post a comment below.

 

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Initial Assessment of a Trauma Patient

These videos, produced by Oxford Medical School, demonstrate the assessment of a trauma patient.  Clear, well-recorded and up to date, they should be useful to update or confirm current practice.  However, they do have a slant towards hospital (as opposed to BASICS or prehospital assessment, which is sometimes more appropriate in the community hospital setting).

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLuC0T7RsKI&feature=relmfu

View the other trauma videos from Oxford Medical School.

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Diploma in Remote and Offshore Medicine

The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh have just released details the new Diploma in Remote and Offshore Medicine.

Aimed at all healthcare providers working in remote and offshore locations, the diploma is based around online CPD modules, along with an eLogbook and access to feedback from tutors.

Modules include topics such as dive medicine, aviation, occupational health, trauma and medical emergencies.   There are further optional modules in expedition & wilderness medicine, tactical medicine and relief/disaster response.

Full details can be found at the Diploma’s website.

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PhD in Rural Health

The Welsh Government has recently been developing a Rural Health Plan and is in the process of starting the process of implementation. In parallel to this the University of Wales has established a Scholar programme – one of these Scholars will have a responsibility for Rural Health and will be based with the Institute of Rural Health and the University of Swansea.

The Scholar will have a research role and will be involved with the evaluation of a number of the rural health projects established by the plan. Instead of the Rural Scholar being answerable to a commercial company (as stated in the advert), he/she will be answerable to to the Rural Health Plan Implementation Board and the University.

The Scholar will receive a bursary and expenses. He/she will be expected to write up their PhD at the end of the three years.

For details, see the advert.  Note that whilst the closing date for expressions of interest was in June, it may still be possible to apply – contact the office for more information.

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PBSG what?

There seems to be two types of Scottish GP at the moment, those who are doing Practice Based Small Group Learning and those who are likely to be soon.  The initiative, supported by NES (NHS Education for Scotland) involves small groups of GPs, Registrars and Practice Nurses getting together to do some scenario-based learning, on topics as diverse as “Family Physician Stress” to “Chronic Kidney Disease” to “ADHD”.

The idea was brought across from McMaster University, where our Canadian GP colleagues have been using this style of learning for some time.  They’ve developed a vast range of scenario-based modules, and from humble beginnings, there are now waves of Scottish GPs signing up to be involved.  Importantly, more and more of the Canadian-written modules are being “tartanised”, so that acetaminophen reads paracetamol, and the dynamics of Scottish/UK general practice are more accurately portrayed in the cases for discussion.

I recently attended Facilitator Training for the PBSGL programme, and came away enthused and keen to promote the idea to others. There has been a particularly strong appetite for PBSGL in the North Scotland, and consequently several groups of rural practitioners have set up virtual groups. These been held by using teleconference, Skype and other online services, with varied degrees of success.  Of course, half the fun of taking part in PBSGL is meeting colleagues face-to-face: this is best done by physical meetings but for some rural practitioners this isn’t possible.  For these situations, there is huge potential to enable rural practitioners to link up (including via occasional physical meetings too), to allow collaborative practice and reduce the professional isolation that so often faces colleages in these areas.

If you work in Scotland and are keen to find out more, have a look at the PBSGL website or contact PBSGLAdministrator.North_PO.SCPMDE@nes.scot.nhs.uk.  There is likely to be a group near you, and if not, you may wish to set up your own group after a bit of facilitator training (which I can vouch is interesting, fun and not intimidating).  If you’re elsewhere in the UK – watch this space, as it may well be coming your direction sometime in the future

Finally, if you’re interested in taking part in virtual meetings – for which you’ll need a microphone & speakers (preferably as a headset) plus webcam – please get in touch with us here at RuralGP Blog so that we can keep you updated with progress.

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eLearning for Rural Practice

Recently I took part in a teleconference with Malcolm Ward, RCGP Chair of the Rural Form, and Ben Riley, Medical Director for eLearning at the RCGP, to discuss ways of improving access to online CPD to rural practitioners.

There is a lot happening to make more online learning accessible to medical practitioners, particularly as the use of online educational modules is increasingly encouraged to support preparation for appraisal and revalidation.  This is reflected in the scale of work happening under the umbrella of the Department of Health’s “E-Learning for Healthcare” programme (see www.e-GP.org).  Royal Colleges of most specialties are investing heavily to offer their members access to accredited and relevant updates.

The RCGP has a number of ongoing projects, but central to revalidation are the Essential Knowledge Updates which some members may already be familiar with.  These aim to provide RCGP members with a 6-monthly update of the most pertinent changes in practice, via an online learning module.

However, through various conversations, the RCGP Rural Forum is acutely aware that some remote and rural practitioners experience significant difficulty in accessing online content, especially due to slow internet connections.  Judging from recent comments from the telecommunications industry, this is unlikely to change overnight.  And so, if too much reliance is placed on high-bandwidth video and media content for eLearning, this could prevent many of our rural colleagues from accessing this core resource.

What’s the answer?  We’d like to invite ideas!  The Rural Forum is looking into ways of signposting rural practitioners to particular modules of interest, and this could include an indicator of how fast your connection needs to be for certain modules.  We are also looking into other ways of providing access to elearning resources – perhaps via CD-Rom or memory stick.  This is work in progress.

In the meantime we would like to invite your comments, not least to understand the scale of the problem.  If you’re a rural GP and concerned about access to these resources – please get in touch, and contribute to our online poll on this issue – available shortly.

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