Archive | Postgraduate

European Resuscitation Academy Day

BASICS Scotland are proud to be hosting this year’s ERA Day which will be held at the Carnoustie Golf Hotel on the 8th September 2017 (the day before our conference).

Places are limited for this event and registrations will be opened up to all at the beginning of March. We are offering BASICS Scotland members the opportunity to register first by accepting registrations from them now! We have also reserved accommodation at the hotel if you want to make a weekend of it by attending both the ERA day and our conference.

For more information and to register visit era.basics-scotland.org.uk

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BASICS Scotland Annual Conference & AGM

BASICS Scotland are pleased to announce their annual conference will take place at the Carnoustie Golf Hotel on Saturday the 9th September 2017.

This year’s theme is “It takes a system to save a life” and there are some fantastic speakers and workshops lined up including:

  • Deputy CMO for the Scottish Government and the Keynote Speaker, Dr Gregor Smith
  • National Clinical Advisor Dr David Caesar on Scotland’s Trauma System
  • The Sandpiper Wildcat Team and their “Story So Far”
  • Angela Lewis of Personal Support Aviation on Human Factors and Responder Welfare

…and many more!

To learn more about the speakers and sponsors at this year’s conference, or to book your place now, visit conference.basics-scotland.org.uk

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Recruiting now for Scottish Rural GP Fellowships 2017

beafellow.ruralgp.com

NES Logo 2005Applications are now being invited for the GP Rural Fellowship Scheme, overseen by NHS Education for Scotland.

The Fellowships offer a fantastic opportunity to build skills and experience in rural general practice, whilst experiencing the challenges and opportunities first-hand – during a well-supported year which includes nine weeks of study leave and a generous study budget.

The Fellowships are located across rural Scotland, from Dumfries & Galloway, to the Shetland Isles, including islands such as Islay, Arran, Skye and the Uists.

Many previous rural fellows have stayed in rural practice, and an article was recently published in the Journal of Rural & Remote Health – highlighting the strengths and successes of the programme which has been running for over ten years.

Rural Fellowship Facebook Page     Rural Fellowship – Official Information

Closing date for applications: Thursday 6th April 2017

Fellowships (one year) commence in August 2017.

Watch the latest video about the Fellowships…

Current Rural Fellow Gemma Munro explains more about her time as a Rural Fellow.

Why be a rural GP?

NHS Highland made this video of rural practice in Kintyre…

 

… and here’s a video from last year featuring some of the current Fellows and others involved with the scheme…

Interested?  We want to hear from you…

All the Rural Fellowship sites will welcome you to chat on the phone or visit and tour round what’s on offer.  We can fix up a chat with current or previous rural fellows, and you can ask questions on our Facebook page.  There is a lot of information available from the websites mentioned already, but sometimes it’s easier to arrange a chat on the phone or Skype… all descriptors of the Fellowships (on the official fellowships page) have contact details where you can find out more.

A couple of years ago we interviewed some of those involved in running the Rural Fellowships.  Hear more from them about what they think the fellowships can offer recently qualified GPs…

Gill Clarke – Fellowships Co-ordinator

gillGill has been running the fellowship scheme now for three years.  I asked her about the opportunities available, and why she thinks the fellowship scheme is a good way to enable recently-qualified GPs to experience rural practice.

Gill is very happy to be contacted about any of the fellowship options.  gillian.clarke1@nhs.net


Angus MacTaggart – Islay Rural GP

angusAngus is one of two principals of Islay Medical Services, which now delivers primary health care across the island, as well as out of hours and hospital services.  He describes the attractions and challenges that he identifies with rural practice.

You can contact Angus at: Angus.mactaggart@nhs.net


Jonathan Hanson – Skye Rural Practitioner (Mackinnon Memorial Hospital)

jonathanJonathan has trained in a multitude of specialties, and has found his ‘perfect’ job requiring constant generalism.  He represents the growing number of ‘acute rural GPs’ who provide hospital-based services as well as out-of-hours GP cover.  With additional strings to his bow such as anaesthetics, the services provided in Broadford mean that patients can frequently be treated locally, instead of facing long journeys to secondary care.

The contact for the Skye Fellowships is now Melanie Meecham: melanie.meecham@nhs.net


Fiona Duff – Primary Care Manager for Caithness & Sutherland (NHS Highland)

fionaFiona oversees GP services to the North of Scotland, which covers a wide geographical area.  Two fellowships are available in this area.  In this interview, Fiona highlights why a move to Sutherland could be a great career move to aspiring rural GPs.

Apologies for the phone interference in this interview, hopefully it is not too distracting!  You can email Fiona at: fiona.duff@nhs.net

 

 

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BASICS Scotland Paediatric Tele-Education Course

basics_logo_new_large_csNews just in from BASICS Scotland about their latest educational offerings…

We are pleased to announce the latest start date for our popular Paediatric Tele-Education Course

Book now for 24th April Start!

This popular course is specifically designed to refresh your knowledge of Paediatric Emergency Medicine

The course covers 9 topics over 9 weeks presented live over internet based video conferencing and recorded for you to watch at your own convenience.

Live sessions will take place on Tuesday evenings 7pm-8pm to allow those with busy schedules during the day to participate.

Topics covered include:

  • Fever and Meningitis
  • Head Injury
  • Seizures
  • Allergy & Anaphylaxis
  • Asthma
  • LRTI
  • Epiglottitis & Croup
  • Gastroenteritis & Dehydration
  • Pain Relief

Can’t make the live sessions?

Don’t worry, each live session is recorded and made available on our E-learning website for you to view in your own time – access to course materials ends 6 weeks after last live session.

Book Now as closing date for registration is Friday 7th April 2017.

What does it cost?

The cost for this course is:

  • £135 for BASICS Scotland members
  • £150 for non-members

To download the information flyers and application form, visit the BASICS Scotland Tele-education page.

To help evaluate the benefits and cost-savings of Tele-education and Remote Skills Training, BASICS Scotland have commissioned a report which can be viewed on the BASICS Scotland website.

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@RuralGPScot launches #ruralLGBTQ resources for #ruralGP

Last week, the Rural GP Association of Scotland (RGPAS) launched a range of guidance designed to make rural practice in Scotland more accessible to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBTQ+) patients.

At the annual RGPAS Conference last year, held in Inverness, we were delighted to welcome Dr Thom O’Neill to talk about LGBTQ+ inequalities in rural areas, and some of the practical ways that as GPs we can reduce barriers to healthcare.  Here he is talking about what doctors can do to better support LGBTQ+ patients.

Thom’s presentation stimulated a lot of discussion, and led to a project whereby he worked with RGPAS to develop factsheets, posters and other materials to help rural GP practices ensure that their services are welcoming to LGBTQ+ patients – especially younger patients.

You can find out more about these resources at: www.ruralgp.scot/lgbtq-plus.

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15th March: Next BASICS Scotland Clinical Governance Meeting

basics_logo_new_large_csBASICS Scotland Clinical Governance Meeting

Wednesday 15th March 2017, 7-8.30pm

The BASICS Scotland Clinical Governance Meetings are held quarterly and are provided over internet based video conferencing allowing you to have a face to face meeting with your peers from the comfort of your own home or work place to share and discuss clinical cases that you may have been involved in or are interested in.

Each meeting consists of a selection of cases which are presented by the person involved and is then opened up for discussion giving you the opportunity to learn from others.

The programme for our meeting on 15th March can be downloaded here, and includes a number of general updates about BASICS Scotland work including our new responder debriefing pilot, a national guideline development group for prehospital care, and 2 cases from Highland.

Join us at the next meeting

This is a free benefit to all BASICS Scotland members and counts towards your CPD!

If you haven’t been to one of our meetings before and would like to attend this or future meetings please email or call Craig Stewart at the BASICS Scotland office – cstewart@basics-scotland.org.uk or tel: 01764 663671.

Invites will automatically be sent out to everyone who has previously attended one of our Clinical Governance Meetings.

The programme for this meeting will be distributed in due course and invites will be sent out on the Tuesday before the meeting.

Not sure how it works?

Never attended one of our internet based video conference sessions using Adobe Connect and unsure of how it all works? Contact Craig at the BASICS Scotland office (cstewart@basics-scotland.org.uk or call 01764 663 671 ) and he will be more than happy to help you get set up.

You can also catch up on previous meetings which will give you a good idea of what is involved by logging into the members area of the BASICS Scotland website ( http://basics-scotland.org.uk/members/clinical-governance/recordings/ ).

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BASICS Courses update

News just in from BASICS Scotland about their CPD day and other forthcoming course information…

CPD Day

We are pleased to offer you the opportunity to attend this specially developed course for BASICS Scotland Responders.

The course is a one day event designed for and specific to doctors, nurses and paramedics who are already BASICS Scotland Responders.

Dates available: 17th and 18th May 2017

Venue: Mobile Skills Unit which will be located at Dr Gray’s Hospital, Elgin

This course is limited to 8 delegates per day so make sure to register your interest asap to guarantee a place.

The course content will include:

  • Simulation training with video augmented debriefs
  • Human factors training with an external expert

Cost to attend is now only £50

Full details and programme available by clicking on the download PDF button below.

If you would like to register for this course please do so by sending an email to courses@basics-scotland.org.uk and provide us with your preferred day of attendance.

As the numbers are restricted places will be given on a first come first served basis and a waiting list will be kept in the event of a cancellation.

Download PDF information from BASICS Website

Future Face-to-Face Courses

If you are looking to attend a PHEC Course of PHPLS Course this year please find below the list of courses available for 2017 below.

10th – 12th March ’17

PHPLS

Carnoustie Golf Hotel

24th – 26th March ’17

PHECC

Carnegie Conference Centre, Dunfermline

21st – 23rd April ’17

PHECC

Islesburgh Hotel, Shetland

12th – 14th May ’17

PHECC

Peebles Hydro, Borders

9th – 11th June ’17

PHECC

Skye

22nd – 24th August ’17

PHECC

Clinical Skills Centre, Western Isles

15th – 17th September ’17

PHECC

Newton Hotel, Nairn, Highland

6th – 8th October ’17

TBC

Orkney

20th – 22nd October ’17

2 x IMC Ref

DGRI, Dumfries

10th – 12th November ’17

PHECC

Craigellachie, Grampian

24th – 26th November ’17

PHECC

DoubleTree, Dundee

If you would like to register for any of the above courses please do so by sending an email to courses@basics-scotland.org.uk

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Rethinking Remote 2 – save the date

Save the date!

The organisers of Rethinking Remote – a conference held in Inverness in May 2016 – have announced that Rethinking Remote 2 will be held on 24th-25th May 2018.

Rethinking Remote 2 will build on the success of the last conference, which included inspiring contributions from international and multidisciplinary rural professionals whilst also highlighting great practice in Scottish rural communities.

Full details will be published in due course (including on RuralGP.com), as well as an invitation for abstracts/poster presentations etc.  Meantime, consider adding this to your diary now …

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RCGP UK Rural Forum Update

RuralGP.com has been provided with this update from the RCGP UK Rural Forum.  Congratulations to Rob on being appointed Chair…

Greetings From Rob Lambourn,  new Chair, RCGP Rural Forum

Hello everyone,

Rob Lambourn

I’d like to introduce myself as new chair of the RCGP Rural Forum. In November 2016  I took over from Malcolm Ward who has done sterling work for the Forum having been  Chair since the Forum’s inception in 2009 –very  many thanks Malcolm.

I work in a small two-handed practice with my wife in Wooler in rural North Northumberland. I have been a member of the RCGP Rural Forum Steering Group, since its inception.  I am also RCGP UK Council member for North East England.  We live in the Scottish Borders with our small children, so know both English and Scottish healthcare systems, albeit the latter from a patient perspective. I am also a longstanding GP trainer and GP advisor to the North East Ambulance Service Clinical advisory Group.

My objectives as Chair are to ensure that the rural health voice is heard, noted and enacted upon both within and outside the College.   To help ensure this I have, in the near future, College meetings with Simon Ashmore and Rebecca Hughes [Executive Director GP Forward View and National Faculty Manager, Operations] and with Professor Nigel Mathers [Honorary Secretary, RCGP]  Outside the College I have forthcoming meetings with the Rural Services Network; an MP who is on the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Health and Social Care; the University of Central Lancashire [who are establishing a rural campus in the Lakes];  NHS England [Midlands and East] who are running a rural event;  GP Training Programmes in North Northumberland and Cumbria [with a view to establishing extended rural training posts].  I will endeavour to keep you posted!

We also have our own Rural Forum Conference and Educational Event on Saturday March 2017 in Glasgow – please come!   We have a full and exciting programme, from ECG interpretation to international comparisons, via CPR updates and child safeguarding [level 3]  – in all an excellent opportunity to learn and refresh skills and knowledge, network with other rural GPs, and help satisfy appraisal and revalidation.  We will also be [briefly] holding our AGM at the Event – if you would like to become involved with the Steering Group please let us know – new faces always welcome.

Best wishes to all,

Rob

Chair, RCGP Rural Forum

You can download the programme and registration form for the RCGP UK Rural Forum educational event by clicking here
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Scotland’s Mobile Simulation Unit – our experience on Arran

In January 2017 the team at Arran Medical Group and Arran War Memorial Hospital hosted a visit from the NHS Education for Scotland Mobile Skills Unit (MSU) – or ‘Skills Bus’ as some folk refer to it. In case you haven’t seen it: the MSU is a lorry, which expands into a workshop area where patient simulation scenarios can be run from a separate control room (also on the lorry). This setup enables a modern simulation facility to be delivered anywhere in Scotland – particularly rural areas – as it only requires a flat piece of land and an electricity hook-up similar to most caravans.

The skills unit just needs a flat area of ground, and an electricity hook-up. We were grateful to Scottish Fire & Rescue for hosting the unit at Lamlash Community Fire Station.

The folks at the Managed Educational Network (MEN) at NHS Education for Scotland (NES) [don’t worry, the acronyms will stop soon!] are keen for awareness to be raised about the unit, particularly its benefits to rural teams. We hope this description of our experience will encourage others to consider arranging a visit with the associated teaching that can often be organised to coincide.

Stop Press 8/9/17 – we were delighted to learn yesterday that the Arran NHS team were awarded the Gordon Nixon Award for this emergency training week. For more details see this page or watch the video below…

Tell me more about the unit…

The MSU operates from its base in Tayside, and can be booked by contacting the MEN team. At the time of writing, Lynn Hardie is overseeing the unit’s bookings and couldn’t have been more helpful in organising for its delivery to Arran for a week.

Once the unit is set up and expanded by the driver, who usually returns the same day back to their base following delivery, there is a large teaching area which comfortably seats up to 12 people. The unit has heating and lighting, and offers a comfortable teaching space.

The unit can be set up – using the James-Bond style concealed TV – to deliver didactic teaching presentations. Whilst this is its most basic of functions, there are some areas in Scotland which will will find this to be a useful function as part of a more comprehensive course.

However, the main purpose of the Unit is by using its SimMan, SimJunior or SimBaby, along with various provided medical paraphernalia, to enable a wide range of patient assessment simulations to be carried out. The unit has been custom-built: its layout enables pragmatic connection points for the mannequins; there is a separate control room set up with appropriate control software; and an impressive ‘SMOTS’ video system records scenarios from three different angles. This is useful both for monitoring progress through a simulation, as well as for playback during scenario feedback.

This sounds a bit complex

The kit is certainly modern, technically impressive, and requires familiarisation. However the MEN runs excellent (and free) Faculty Development Courses (FDC) – usually at the Scottish Simulation Centre in Larbert – to introduce potential hosts to the simulation equipment and also the daily setup and operation of the unit.

We found the FDC to be fun, interesting and useful – not only for the operation of the unit but for generic skills in running simulations and delivering effective feedback.

The unit also comes with relatively idiot-proof set up instructions, as well as an A-Z guide of equipment and a very helpful troubleshooting guide. This is all covered in the FDC and the MSU team also make themselves available by phone to help sort out any urgent problems during a visit.

OK, but who can we get to help us?

Dr Mark Davidson, Consultant with the ScotSTAR paediatric team, was one of several skilled colleagues who provided excellent teaching during the week.

The unit can be used by confident local teams to deliver training, however we would highly recommend requesting input from the ScotSTAR transfer teams who are often able to provide outreach support for rural training visits. In our case, over the duration of a week, we allocated Monday & Tuesday for paediatric acute care, Wednesday for obstetric emergencies, and Thursday & Friday for adult acute care. For this we were able to enlist the excellent help of the ScotSTAR Paediatric Retrieval Team, the Scottish Multiprofessional Maternity Development Programme (SMMDP) and EMRS (Emergency Medical Retrieval Service) who each came to Arran and delivered excellent teaching – including simulation sessions – during their stay.

In addition we invited a number of clinicians at Crosshouse Hospital – to whom we usually refer our cases – and their involvement was crucial both in clarifying local protocols and also understanding some of the challenges that we face in the rural and community hospital setting when referring to them and their teams.

How did it go?

Our local fire station provided excellent additional presentation space to run workshops, lectures and ample catering facilities.

We found that smaller groups worked best for simulation sessions. We also benefitted from the free use of our Lamlash Community Fire Station (who also kindly provided electricity and additional training space) as well as a daily donation of snacks and food for our Faculty from the Co-op.

Over the week the programme progressed through paediatric, obstetric and adult sessions. We allocated 10-14 clinicians into each morning or afternoon session, usually splitting them up into two groups to alternate between simulation and workshop training. We also held lunchtime ‘drop-in’ update sessions on topics such as sepsis, DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis), drug overdose and ECG interpretation; and we invited our First Responders to an evening of simulation too.

We delivered over 540 training hours during the week to Arran’s GPs, nurses, nursing assistants and paramedics/technicians, and collated feedback using SurveyMonkey – which was generally very positive and indicated an enthusiasm for doing more simulation training in the future.

What went particularly well?

Multidisciplinary colleagues worked together in simulations, and this reflected the nature of work on Arran in our community hospital.

Our teams enjoyed working in the same multi-disciplinary setup that we usually work in. For example, at our community hospital, it is common for a GP, two nurses, a nursing assistant and paramedics to continue working on an emergency case on arrival at the hospital, and we emulated this in teaching scenarios. The quality and experience of our Faculty – comprising experienced consultants, nurses and paramedics – was clearly appreciated by participants, along with the relevance of the teaching.

Prior to the training week, we surveyed our colleagues to identify what they felt were priority areas for development. As expected, sepsis and acute coronary syndrome were low down the priorities – there has already been a focus on these areas in our hospital (and nationally) over the last few years. Higher up were – obstetric emergencies, unresponsive/hypoxic children, severe asthma, drug overdose and major trauma; and so these were the areas that we focussed our training on this year.

During the week we kept a ‘Great Ideas’ board updated using post-it notes, to capture great suggestions and points for further consideration following the course. Collating this at the end of the week provided not only a snapshot of over 40 learning outcomes, but a great range of action points for implementation, as a result of discussion during the week.

What would we have done differently?

Based on feedback, we might have built in more time for skills stations – for example airway management, NG tube placement, chest drain insertion and femoral line access. There is equipment to provide this training on the Unit, however we opted to focus on more simulation training for our week.

Any further efforts to keep groups small and reflective of typical team configurations would have had benefits too, although the feedback indicated that most of the time this was achieved.

We also found – as do organisers of similar training – that running a week can be tiring!  Inevitably, there is a bit of running around before and during the week, to sort out equipment, printing documents and keeping a track on the programme.  Two of us kept an eye on this, and our advice to anyone considering running a training week would include the importance of running the week as a team, with adequate time to oversee the logistics!

What about funding?

We used local training funding to free up time in order for two Arran clinicians to attend the Faculty Development Course, as well as some admin time required before, during and after the training week. Funding was also identified for GP locums – and this, combined with restricted leave during the week – meant that we were able to maintain normal service whilst maximising participation in the training scenarios.

The crucial advantage that we had by involving ScotSTAR teams is that they were able to fund their input via their own team outreach budgets – this is centrally funded with the aim of supporting rural clinicians, and so the conversion factor between local funding and the ‘worth’ of the week was 3-4 (i.e. we gained nearly four times as much value from the local funding required to organise the week).

Interested?

The SMMDP programme ran a fantastic, relevant- and fun – one day course on obstetric emergencies for us. Twenty staff from all disciplines attended.

David Hogg (GP) and Ailsa Weir (Senior Charge Nurse) oversaw the week of training. We can both be contacted via Arran War Memorial Hospital if you wish to find out more about our week. Lynn Hardie (Mobile Skills Unit Project Officer) was instrumental in organising the unit to be available, and our attendance at the Faculty Development Course. Lynn’s contact details are available on the MEN website.

In terms of team contacts, Sandra Stark (Nurse Consultant, ScotSTAR Paediatric Team) and Kate Silk (Programme Administrator at SMMDP) were our key links and very helpful in setting up the training. Every rural area in Scotland has an EMRS ‘link consultant’ and this should be the route that EMRS involvement is requested. In our case we were grateful to Dr Drew Inglis and Dr Doug Maxwell for their input.

If you are keen to consider a visit to your local area, contact the MSU team in the first instance, and they will be able to advise on availability, and advise on how to set up an appropriate programme of training.

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